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Biden Signs $1.2T Infrastructure Bill: ‘America is Moving Again’

Pres. Joe Biden (D) talks to Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) as Senate Majority Leader Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and Vice President Kamala Harris (D) look on after signing the Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act during a South Lawn ceremony on Monday. Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images.

Money headed for Maryland

According to the White House, Maryland will receive at least $6.9 billion for improvements to highways, water infrastructure, airports and internet service.

There are more than 2,201 miles of highway and 273 bridges in poor condition in Maryland and each driver in the state incurs about $637 in costs each year because of driving on roads in need of repair, according to the White House. Based on increased formula funding, Maryland will likely receive $4.1 billion in federal highway funding and $409 million for bridge repairs over the next five years.

Maryland is also likely to receive $1.7 billion over five years to improve public transportation in the state; about 23% of transit vehicles in the state are past their useful life, according to the White House.

The state is expected to receive $63 million over the next five years to expand its electric vehicle charging network and at least $100 million to provide broadband internet coverage. More than a million people will be eligible for an Affordability Connectivity Benefit, which will help low-income families pay for internet access.

The state will receive $844 million to improve drinking water infrastructure, $158 million to improve airports, and $15.9 million to protect against cyberattacks.

The bill contains an increase of $238 million over five years for the Chesapeake Bay Program through U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

“The Chesapeake Bay is a national treasure that has been severely degraded. President Biden’s bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act will help save it. Time is running out,” Chesapeake Bay Foundation President William C. Baker said. “There are less than five years to go for states to fulfill their commitments to improve water quality. Much more still needs to be done, especially in reducing pollution from agriculture. But this is a good start. It will put practices in place that reduce pollution.”

Baker also encouraged Congress to pass Biden’s social and climate spending bill, the Build Back Better Act, which would invest more than $28 billion nationwide in conservation funding to help farmers reduce pollution.

‘Part one of two’